#GOT like #FANTASY #SERIES #RECOMMENDATION

Gardens of the Moon, Steven Erikson

On second read…

Yes, I’ve come to The Malazan Book of the Fallen a second time, or (I should say) I’ve come to finish Gardens of the Moon for a second time and have begun Deadhouse Gates, again, aiming to finish it (this time) and complete the core of the series by Steven Erikson. If memory serves me correctly, I must have dropped this series when I began to watch The Game of Thrones on HBO. Beginning a few seasons behind and with a binge, I joined the bandwagon.

This is the series I’ve been more serious about in curiosity, though had tucked it under a blanket in the back of my mind for when I would thirst for a great story again and planned on rereading it from the start of my GOT romance. Without visual production for the screen and being a much more voluminous series than GOT and not a part of mainstream pop culture, The Malazan Book of the Fallen appeals more greatly as a series that I want to read over seeing it on the screen. To put this story on film would break the entire bank and be a double-decade undertaking, at least.

As well, the series lured me to it again because I enjoyed the complexity of The Game of Thrones, the violence and darkness, and the hope the great characters brought to the fantasy tale, but I did want more than this only. MBotF’s complexity is greater than GOT’s. Magic of demons, Gods, High Mages, Lords of Darkness, power higher than on display in the series GOT, adds layers of complexity players of Dungeons & Dragons enjoy, which multiplies possible foreshadowing through the tale. The story runs deeper than visual representation. Yes, like GOT, MBotF’s plots lead near and far, but the magic use in the story brings on a vaster reality of war.

Erikson’s style reads as well as watching a movie. Readers are never at a lack for plot progression or interesting detail. Every moment of Gardens of the Moon motivated me to continue to read.